Music copyrights and you, basics

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chantal012

Re: Music copyrights and you, basics

Postby chantal012 » Fri Sep 18, 2009 7:33 am

I spoke to a lawyer this morning (don't forget - I'm in Canada). He said it's different in Canada than in the States.
As a preliminary discussion, he says that if the person who is purchasing the service from me is providing the song (legally purchased) - it wouldn't be a problem...unless that person made copies & sold those dvds... that's another issue but I'm not the one being pursued.

That's how he sees things from his knowledge of the industry. OF course, he'll have to dig a bit deeper to make sure...and we'll work on a sample contract together.

I'm thinking I'll move forward with this...yes, it'll cost me a few hundreds but I might make a few hundreds and more too! :lol:

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Re: Music copyrights and you, basics

Postby BarbaraC » Fri Sep 18, 2009 7:58 am

I don't know the answer to this question, but I immediately put myself in the position of an American musician looking at his or her work being used in Canada in a way that's not legal in the States but is, apparently, legal in Canada. I know this sort of thing has happened, and my memory is of lawsuits, but I don't know what the outcome was. Doubtless, it was in situations wider spread than what you're speaking of.

I just keep thinking about all the poor (literally) writers, artists, and musicians out there who work at least as hard as everyone else.

Barbara
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chantal012

Re: Music copyrights and you, basics

Postby chantal012 » Fri Sep 18, 2009 8:20 am

I see your point Barbara... but I will be offering songs that are Free Royalty, etc...

If the client wants another song of his choice, well then I'll add it for FREE - meaning I won't CHARGE MORE because it's a known artist's song.

The major part of this work isn't THE SONG... I aint' reproducing his whole CD and selling COPIES of it nor am I making millions off of my work! I mean... if my work includes a royalty free song...then I won't be making MORE money because of that popular song.

Anyhow, that's my perception.

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Re: Music copyrights and you, basics

Postby BarbaraC » Fri Sep 18, 2009 9:12 am

I understand your thinking even though I also understand the other side of the equation. Royalty-free music, I thought, wasn't the question here, but rather, the occasional use of copyrighted music. For the latter, the easiest way to think about it and that's been mentioned here in the forum before is that no one buying a CD owns the music on that CD. The only thing they own is a plastic disk.

Granted, I'm a terrible hypocrite when it comes to personal use, having often enough shared shows that were accompanied by music I in no way paid for. I'd be awfully careful, however, about using someone else's intellectual property in a commercial way without compensation.

One thing you might look into are the huge collections of music out there under Creative Commons licensing where the musicians ask sometimes pitiful amounts for the use of their music.

Barbara
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Re: Music copyrights and you, basics

Postby Astra » Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:27 am

To BarbaraC:
BarbaraC wrote: .....I think whether you see something as a "rip off" is wholly dependent on where you stand: the design end or the consumer end. ....Barbara

Barbara, I agree with you - to define something being "rip off" would mean asking many times more then people would consider to buy, consumers would shudder and would not purchase anything. And since the company is still in business and has many customers who are buying .... Price is then acceptable for them and they are getting their money worth .....
====================================================================
To ChrissyC:
ChrissyC wrote:Oh man I want this software, does it ever go on sale?? Chrissy.......
Alexandra you explained it perfectly...:)

Software itself:
- A. "Small" brother -" Express Track" - is free with first purchase of CD Music ,
- B. "Big" brother version "Scoring Edition") is $99, I did not see it on sale,
- C. Music CD's are on sale - several times during a year.

And I'm glad I was able to explain the SmartSound concept for people to understand,
thank you for your comment.
=====================================================================
to JRosenthal:
jrosenthal wrote:Alexandra;
I have been using Sonicfire for about 4 years now, Cant agree more with you, if you need music flexibility, this is the software. ......Of course this is just my opinion .....

Thanks for the confirmation of the strength and usability of software int Producer -(wow - 4 years !!!) -
you have more experience then I have, would love to hear about it more from you.
...And about my preference for SoniFire & its way "to make a music" - I agree with you - it is just each person own opinion...
===================================================================

Alexandra
Last edited by Astra on Mon Oct 12, 2009 5:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Music copyrights and you, basics

Postby Auster » Tue May 17, 2011 3:54 am

I've just had a browse on some U.K. sites and found that the copyright for music is 50 years from the end of the year that it was first performed/recorded.
For written and artistic, including computer programmes, 70 years after the death of the writer or artist.

By the look of things, it seems we are o.k, in England at least, to use any music released in or prior to 1960.

There were a lot of good tracks released back then, so how do we stand in the U.S?

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Re: Music copyrights and you, basics

Postby DickK » Mon Sep 12, 2011 4:27 am

Auster wrote:I've just had a browse on some U.K. sites and found that the copyright for music is 50 years from the end of the year that it was first performed/recorded... By the look of things, it seems we are o.k, in England at least, to use any music released in or prior to 1960....


Not any more for those in the EU -- don't know if the UK follows EU rules for this or not.
Story here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-14882146

Dick
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Re: Music copyrights and you, basics

Postby CharlesPearson » Sat Mar 29, 2014 7:46 am

Dick - If there is any EU Regulation then the UK will follow it usually.
My internet was down today so I had to spend time with my family. They seem like decent people!

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