wide angle zoom

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wide angle zoom

Postby juanb1203 » Sat Apr 05, 2008 3:54 pm

Hello, I have a Nikon D50, and I'm in need of a wide angle zoom lens. So is there a lens that even though I'm zooming in, will still keep the width at the same time while I'm zooming in? And if so, please give me some suggestions.

Thank you

Juan

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Postby gpsmikey » Sat Apr 05, 2008 6:10 pm

If you are asking if there is a lens that at the wide angle portion gives you
say 80 degrees coverage and you want to be able to zoom in on something
and still maintain that 80 degree coverage, the answer is no. If you have
the camera set to the high resolution jpg, then you can zoom in on a portion
of the picture in your show for example, but a given focal length will have
a specific angle of view for a given camera. There is no way around that
issue.

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Postby Auster » Sun Apr 06, 2008 2:25 am

You will have to take a series of shots and stitch them together using a program like Roxio Photosuite if you want that effect.

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Postby briancbb » Sun Apr 06, 2008 2:40 am

Juan

As Auster has said. stitching overlapping photos is the way to go.

The opening titles of this show http://www.photodex.com/sharing/viewsho ... 3813&alb=0 have a photo at the top made by joining 7 overlapping photos together to give a 'wide angle' view. The second slide of the show (after the titles) is a 'pan' across this combinations of photos. The art is to use a tripod, or swing your body on the same axis, and make sure you have overlap, and no change in camera settings while shooting the series of photos. The 'overlap' between successive pictures is so that the software can merge the photos.

I use 'Panorama Factory' to stitch my photos, but there are many programs available. I believe Photoshop CS3 does it now, but not as successfully as dedicated programs.

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Postby gpsmikey » Sun Apr 06, 2008 7:14 am

Also, if shooting a panorama type shot covering a significant angle, DON'T have
a polarizer on - you will never be able to put them together later due to the
way the polarizer handles reflections etc. :?

mikey
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Postby Tarafrost » Tue Apr 15, 2008 5:38 am

gpsmikey wrote:Also, if shooting a panorama type shot covering a significant angle, DON'T have
a polarizer on - you will never be able to put them together later due to the
way the polarizer handles reflections etc. :?


Similar caution applies to automatic exposure settings, though those can more often be fixed in post. Best to set exposure to manual for panos.
....Andrzej (aka: the curmudgeon)

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